Friday, September 8, 2017

The constant buzz

... of wasps, hornets and yellow jackets fills the air and we encounter numerous dug up yellow jacket nests wherever we go.
They can't possibly all have been dug up by bears - we easily walk past 10 newly destroyed nests every day -, though there are a lot of trees with remnants of wasp and hornet nests where the scratch marks on the trunk tell exactly that tale.
The buzz that fills the woods tells a more complex story, though. This summer, a major outbreak of aphids and leaf beetles attacked the poplars, willows and even soapberry bushes in our area. Honeydew, a sticky sugary liquid secreted by the aphids as they eat the plant's sap, coated the entire understory of the deciduous forest, sticking to our hands, the dog's fur and everything else like glue. The leaves of fireweed and blades of grass turned glossy with the stuff.

Yellow jackets, hornets and wasps prey on leaf pests, so I assume their crazy number this year has a direct connection to the aphid outbreak - and the proliferation of wasp nests seems to draw more bears than we usually see into the area. Which in turn may have resulted in moose cows and calves keeping a very low profile. Maybe moose are also affected by the compromised browse and seek out areas that haven't been affected by the aphids? Either way, we hardly see any moose or even sign of them, which is very unusual.

The plague of yellow jackets even displaced us from our outhouse: I assume they are hunting for flies in the pit. Lowering bared sensitive body parts onto the seat and thereby sealing in stinging insects below is too unnerving; we've set up a temporary bucket system in our wood shed.

In mid-August, we paddled and portaged into a smaller lake and were rewarded with a reprieve from the waps, thanks to the prevailing spruce forest.
Our foldable canoe made the three portages easier:
 Our dog enjoyed living the easy life once again, getting conveyed across the lakes by his people and frolicking along the portage trails while we grunted and swore.
Golden sunrise after rain


Moose skull and antlers



Fall is colouring the trees now, who must be thorougly looking forward to shedding their poor sucked and eaten leaves. It's going to be an interesting moose hunt this year - are they going to return from wherever they've been hanging out?


6 comments:

  1. This year has been almost yellow jacket free. I put up traps in May and didn't get one until mid-August. Even now they are few and far between. Maybe they all headed up your way. But I'm not complaining. - Margy

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    1. Yeah, if anyone out there wants a few, we'd be happy to part with them!

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  2. What glorious country you live in! And your dog is exquisite! In spite of the yellowjackets, you are incredibly blessed.

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  3. Well Done on your accomplishments this last year Nicole. Its great to see you back in the wilderness again. Talk with you soon.

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    1. Thanks, Russ! I just hope most of the animals I looked after will survive ... What with the hot weather, drought and wildfires in southern BC where many of the bears had to be released, I am deeply worried about their fate.

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